Archive for culture

12th Annual Inner Mongolia Food Expo

April 15-17 the Inner Mongolia International Exhibition Center is holding the 12th Annual Inner Mongolia Food Exhibition.

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You can see more about the event here and here.

A few people asked in the wechat groups about the time of day it closes each day, but I couldn’t find that information on any of the sites.

And you can find all the events happening at the International Exhibition Center here.

And here is a map of where the center is.

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Friday’s foreigner: Preston

After a couple weeks off, we’re back with our Friday’s foreigner series. This week, meet Preston!

**I’m editing this post to include a link to the guest post Preston submitted for us some time back about buying a car in Hohhot.**

What’s your name, where are you from, what brought you to Hohhot and when did you arrive?

My name is Preston Decker, and I’m from the Greater Boston area in the USA. I’m here in Hohhot because my wife is a Hohohotite, or Hohhotian, or Hohhotanese, or whatever you call someone from Hohhot. We came back here together in 2014 after working in Xiamen the two years previous to that.

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If you are doing something different now than when you first arrived tell us about that also.

When Linda (my wife) and I first came here, I had just stopped teaching English at a high school in Xiamen, and was preparing to set up a translation service in the States (I already had several years of translation experience at the time). The translation service is going strong, and so I now have a translation business in the States. We’re only in China for a few months a year at most, so I don’t need to look for a job in Hohhot when we’re back.

If you have free time, what do you do with it?

I’ve been studying the Uyghur language for the last four years, which I became interested in during my year of teaching English in Xinjiang. Progress has been very slow, but that’s my main personal project at the moment. Other than that, exercise, preferably off in the Da Qing Mountains, or up on the plateau, but most often at the gym at Hailiang.
You’re recently returned to Hohhot after some time away. What, if any, differences or changes did you observe upon your return?

The Second Ring Road! My wife’s family’s home is right next to the south Second Ring Road (南二环). Last year this whole area was an absolute hellhole (sorry for the language, but it’s true), with tons of dust spewing into the air from construction, and roads that looked like they came right out of a Texas horror movie (potholes galore). We left to go back to America in June 2015, and just got back here a month ago—what a difference! The second ring road is beautiful, and we’ve saved hours already off our driving times (I have a driver’s license and my wife and I bought a car here two years ago). It used to take me over an hour to fight through city traffic up to the Da Qing Mountains to go hiking, but it now takes only 25 minutes via the Second Ring Road. Only 20 minutes to get to Jinchuan, whereas it used to be 45. 15 minutes to my wife’s driving school, down from 30. Good job by Hohhot on this one!

You’ve also lived in other parts of China, what comparisons and contrasts can you make about Hohhot in relation to other places?

I’ve lived in Tianjin, Beijing, Xiamen and Kuitun (Xinjiang). The easiest comparison is with Xinjiang, especially in terms of the terrain and cuisine—lots of open space and mutton. I still contend that there’s no better place in the world than Xinjiang because of its wonderful mix of deserts, alpine forests, grasslands, history and culture, but Inner Mongolia comes in a pretty close second of the places I’ve lived.

All of the cities I’ve lived in Northern China (Beijing, Hohhot, Kuitun) have been pretty bad in winter in terms of pollution, and Xiamen definitely comes out a cut ahead in that regard, although I’ve heard things are getting a bit worse there too.

Hohhot is definitely the most free-wheeling of these cities. I’m pretty sure some of the more gentle inhabitants of Xiamen would go running back home if asked to take an e-bike out into Hohhot traffic. I’d also say, oddly enough, that people in Hohhot are more parochial and conservative in their attitudes towards outsiders (and foreigners), even if they’re more boisterous with friends and relatives.

Surprisingly enough, Xinjiang has the most easily understandable Mandarin of these four cities. I think it’s because the Han people there mostly move out there in scattered groups, or as part of more diverse movements (the bingtuan 兵团, etc.) ,and so were forced to drop their local accents in favor of one with which they could communicate with each other more easily. Beijing has that great hamburger gurgle, while Xiamen residents struggle between being made fun of for their Mandarin (fu instead of hu, etc.) and trying to maintain their local language which is in danger of dying out. Xiamen Minnanhua really is a completely different language from Mandarin—I’ll never forget going to a church there filled with old Minnanhua speakers and listening to an interpreter translate the priest’s Mandarin into Minnanhua sentence by sentence.

What’s surprised me is how different the Mandarin accent is here: even after 15 years of Chinese study and 5 years in China, I still struggle to pick up Hohhot’s local Cidihua accent, especially when spoken by my wife’s family who live up near Bailingmiao (百灵庙)。

Favorite local food and where you like to get it:

Definitely Shao Mai and mutton of all kinds.

If you could make one city-wide change to Hohhot, what would it be?

How about a road that runs a circuit around the city at 80 km per hour and has no traffic lights? Oh wait…

Jokes aside, probably better trash collection. We live in the old part of the city, about a mile and a half south of Dazhao temple, and while it’s fun to wash the local dogs play amidst 10 feet high piles of trash, it would be nice to see those piles get cut down in size a bit.

If you had a friend visiting and could take them to only one place in Hohhot, where would it be?

The Da Qing Mountains or anywhere on the Inner Mongolia Plateau. I really like the country near Xilinhot, though that’s a long car trip away.

What’s the funniest thing you’ve experienced here?

Last year I developed a bit of an obsession for a little place on the Mongolian border north of Bailingmiao called Mandula (满都拉). It’s a secondary border crossing with Mongolia, only open during certain periods of the year, and I had the fantastic idea that it would be fun to go up there for a visit. So I drove up there last June. It was a beautiful drive, and I drove up past Zhaohe, before continuing through Bailingmiao and heading off towards Mandula.

Mandula is about 120 km past Bailingmiao (which itself is about 150km from Hohhot). There were no signs to warn away foreigners (I had been worried about that), and the country was beautiful, with alternating grasslands and hills. I even saw a couple of herds of camels.

I got up to Mandula and found it to be a one road town with a few earth houses and shops hugging the road. A cow lounged in the street. The border crossing had just closed two days before, and so the town was nearly deserted, although there was plenty of foreign goods (and I’m sure fake foreign goods as well) like alcohol and chocolate in the few stores that were open. If you’ve been to Erlian, you know the type, as all these goods come over the border from Mongolia.

I was having a grand time walking up and down the street, when a soldier in army fatigues spotted me and came over. He was clearly suspicious, and quickly called in his superior officer, who took me back to the base. They kept me there for four hours, questioning me about why I would ever come alone to see a place as remote as Mandula.

In fairness to them, the soldiers were quite nice and polite, and all border areas in China are rather sensitive, but it was still a nerve-wracking experience. As it turned out, part of the reason it took them so long to let me go is that none of their superior officers wanted to take responsibility for my situation, meaning my case got passed up a long line of officers, and then, as one of the soldiers said “we’ll have to wait a long time for the final decision to get passed back down that line.”

Luckily, the final decision was to let me go, which is why it’s a funny, not alarming, story.

So I guess the moral of the story is that although the surrounding area is beautiful, and although there’s no sign prohibiting a foreigner from driving a car up there, it’s probably best to stay away from Mandula.

What is the kindest thing a local has ever done for you?

Marrying me!

 

 

Hohhot was voted #1 city for….

…any guesses?

The best city for growing old. I’m not sure who voted or what factors determined the rating, but you can read the article in Chinese below and see the other top ten cities.

Do you agree? Is Hohhot deserving of this distinction?

I think it’s a place that still holds more traditional values than the big coastal cities, so I can see it getting this vote in that regard, as the young here still feel an obligation to care for elderly relatives. However, I’m surprised considering the climate of Hohhot that Chinese people would think such a cold place is a good place to grow old.

 

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Learn Mongolian in 20 minutes

A friend shared this video with us this week. It sets out to teach you everything you need to communicate in Mongolian with only the information from the video and a Mongolian-English dictionary….in only 20 minutes.

It was posted by a wechat public account called Buryat (BuLiYaTa) You can follow them at: buryat_mongol.

The video was made by Santis Educational Services. The video is made for the Outer Mongolian version of Monoglian, but everything I heard in the video applies to the version spoken here as well, minus some minor accent differences.

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What do you think? Can you speak Mongolian now? If you can truly speak Mongolian, what is the video missing?

Inner Mongolia Chorus Performance

Below are some photos and videos from Inner Mongolia Chorus’s performance of international music. They performed selections from China, Russia, Germany, US, Italy, and more.
There’s another showing tonight at 8 pm at the the performance hall just north of the museum. The address is on Beiyuan Road, but that takes you to the back of the building, so walk around to the front if you enter from Beiyuan. There’s a small road just north of the museum, that round will take you to the entrance of the building, which is white with holes/small circles covering the building.
Tickets are free but you have to have one to enter.



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fireworks!

We made this video to show our friends and family back home, so you folks that live here will find the brief moments of commentary quite lame.

Anyway, here is what the New Year’s eve fireworks looked like form our house. It in no way compared to our previous 18th floor view, but it still put most US cities’ 4th of July celebrations to shame.

CNY 2016 3 from Jill Judd on Vimeo.

 

 

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Happy New Year!

 

The cacophony of fireworks have already begun near our house.

Here’s to hoping that all of your have a wonderful time saying good-bye to the year of sheep and welcoming the year of the monkey (and that your children are able to sleep through the noise)!

We wish you a very, very happy lunar new year!

If you’re celebrating with Chinese friends here and here are some fancy ways to make jiao zi if you really want to impress.

And here is a list of Chinese new year greetings, complete with audio!

And here is another list of 108 Chinese new year greetings. (some duplicates)

 

 

Hohhot made CCTV’s facebook page

You can check out this video of police nabbing a thief. The video is complete with dramatic music and everything.

You can follow CCTV on facebook for news all over China.

 

What do you think about the video? Have you been pick-pocketed? Tell us your thoughts in the comments.

 

Also, happy Li Chun!

I’m not exactly sure what that means, but it’s today and I think it is the first day of spring according to the lunar calendar. If that’s correct, the lunar calendar and I disagree about the meaning of spring.

 

 

Mongolian Fire Ceremony

Today is a significant Mongolian holiday, but I’m not exactly sure what the best English translation for the day should be…fire remembrance day? Fire Ceremony?

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*photo courtesy of Manda

Anyway, the holiday has its basis in animism and the historical respect for/worship of fire.

Here’s a brief article about it.

Here are some videos that were circulating on wechat today. *the audio is Mongolian

 

Mongolian calligraphy

I only understand a few hundred words of Mongolian so I can’t understand much of this video, but it’s a beautiful tribute to the Mongolian script.

Remember to check out studymongolian.net if you are interested in learning Mongolian.

If you’re interested in getting a Mongolian tutor, check out Caide Consulting.

If the embedded video doesn’t display properly use this link.
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